I’ll Get To It Later

 

Did you know that more adults are chronic procrastinators than suffer from depression, phobia, panic attacks and alcoholism? Procrastination is rampant and not just something to joke about, according to Joseph Ferrari, a psychology professor and author of the book “Still Procrastinating? The No Regret Guide to Getting It Done.”

“We try to trivialize this tendency, but it’s not a funny topic,” Ferrari said to The Washington Post.

Ferrari’s research shows that procrastination affects every age, race, gender and creed. He says that there are many reasons for it such as low self-esteem and mood regulation. If you’re in a foul mood, you’re less likely to tackle a challenge. Other researchers say that even though procrastination is pervasive, it is irrational.

“Why would somebody put something off to the last minute, and then they’re stressed out of their mind, and they end up doing a poor job or less than an optimal job on it? And then they feel bad about it afterward, and it may even have implications for other people,” said Fuschia Sirois, a professor of psychology at the University of Sheffield in England.

Procrastination can be a real detriment, not just to productivity, but to emotional wellbeing. It can lead to increased levels of anxiety, stress, depression, sleep deprivation and other health problems. So maybe it’s time to stop teasing yourself and others about this as a trivial bad habit?

 

 

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